Hen Harrier Day
​Under construction

One of the many challenges facing our natural environment is the persecution of predators, in particular the illegal killing of birds of prey. Hen Harriers have become the most persecuted species of birds in relation to their population size. This puts many of their populations on the brink of extinction, at a time when we need our predator species most of all. For keeping prey species populations healthy, for maintaining ecological balances and to show other countries that we can look after our own wildlife. Especially when we lobby them over the issues like ivory trade, but to those who love wildlife it's about being able to enjoy our countryside with all the species that call it home. Every species is functioning part, if we remove a native species is like removing a random part of the car, bus, train or plane that you just travelled in to see what happens...
Each year Hen Harrier Days are held across the UK to celebrate our birds of prey and highlight their battle for survival and our fight give them the space they need to thrive.
Hen Harriers are one of the smaller species of birds of prey, with male and female birds having very different plumage.

The Problem...

Back in the the late 19th century the Hen Harrier had been hunted to extinction on the British Mainland, with a small but healthy population clinging on in the Orkney Isles. Gamekeepers and missguided public had pushed them to the edge of their existence. But following changes to in society following the two world wars they gradually crept back. It seemed as though the Hen Harrier could once again become a common sight across the British uplands. However this turned the other way as we entered the 21st century, the population crashed with seeminly healthy adults going missing at times when food is easily available. With the help of sattelite technology many of these birds seem to be going missing close to grouse moors and shooting estates.

Hen Harrier Day 2019

You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear. Selecting 'Edit Text' from this menu will also allow you to edit the text within this text box. Remember to keep your wording friendly, approachable and easy to understand as if you were talking to your customer

Packham, Avery and the Sodden 570

You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear. Selecting 'Edit Text' from this menu will also allow you to edit the text within this text box. Remember to keep your wording friendly, approachable and easy to understand as if you were talking to your customer

Mascots

Every cause needs a face, one to capture the attention of the public and engage them in the cause.  Hen Harrier Day has two mascots for this purpose, Henry the Hen Harrier, a rather large human sized male and 'our' Calluna a large juvenille. 
Henry is a male who is seeking a mate across the UK's moorlands, while 'our' Calluna takes her name from a sattelite tagged bird who vanished under suspicious circumstances over a grouse moor on 12th August 2017. One week on from the first Sheffield Hen Harrier Day.
They pop up on social media from time to time and if you're lucky you may find yourself at a Hen Harrier Day event. Don't worry, they wont bite and often like to have their pictures taken with people.

Sheffield Hen Harrier Days

We organise the event when it comes to Sheffield following on from the Peak District Rallies of 2014,15 & 16. As there wasn't an event taking place in the Peaks during 2017, we took the decision to organise an even in Sheffield City Centre. The idea was to bring it out of the countryside, to a new group of people, hopefully increasing our reach. With the BBC. Sheffield Star, Sheffield Telegraph and Sheffield Live attending our events and reporting them across the city and the wider region, it worked. At present there aren't any plans for a Sheffield Hen Harrier Day for 2019, but keep your eyes on our news feeds and BAWC's for event updates.

2017

2018